• 34 million year old microscopic planktonic foraminifera fossils from Java, Indonesia. Photo by Helen Coxall
  • Coring operation on the aft deck of icebreaker Oden. Photo by Martin Jakobsson
  • Deformed limestone, Taimyr expedition. Photo by Vicky Pease
  • Folding on Crete. Photo by Alasdair Skelton
  • Iceland. Photo by Elisabeth Däcker
  • Iceland.Photo by Elisabeth Däcker
  • Oden's bridge, SWERUS expedition. Photo by Björn Eriksson
  • Oman. Photo by Alexandre Peillod
  • Punta di Maiata, Italy. Photo by Jan Backman
  • Siccar Point in Scotland. Photo by Alasdair Skelton
  • Swedish Icebreaker Oden, Lomrog expedition. Photo by Martin Jakobsson
  • Swedish Icebreaker Oden outside Svalbard. Photo by Martin Jakobsson

An international team of scientists, led by Swedish researchers from Stockholm University and in partnership with UK researchers from the Natural History Museum (NHM) London, and Plymouth University, has found evidence in the sediments of an ancient Swedish lake that it was the melting of the Scandinavian ice sheet that provides the missing link to what occurred at the end of the last Ice Age. The study, published in Nature Communications, examined moisture and temperature records for the region and compared these with climate model simulations.

Francesco Muschitiello, one of IGV's PhD researchers, is the lead author of the study.

Sediments from an ancient Swedish lake provide information about the climate at the end of the last Ice Age.

Read more about the study

Link to the Plymouth University press  release

Link to the Swedish press release

Link to the article

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